A national document of this magnitude required numerous hours of dialogue, research, evaluating, and editing. The development and production of the Primary School Mathematics Curriculum Guidelines could not have been made possible without the hard work, dedication, and commitment of Education Officers, principles, teachers, clerical officers, parents and members of the community who participated in the Needs Assessment Survey.

 

This curriculum document is intended to foster an understanding of the “whys” of Mathematics as well as appropriately meet the current and future needs of the student population in schools across The Bahamas.

 

The use of current research in Mathematics and a working knowledge of entry requirements for programmes at The College of The Bahamas and Colleges in the United

States, Canada, Great Britain and the University of the West Indies as well as adherence to our own goals, constituted the basis used by curriculum developers to formulate the objectives/content of this document.

 

It is our intention that teachers and parents use this document to guide their teaching of Mathematics, supplementing it with activities from texts and other resources to help our students attain the goals that are outlined in this document. READ MORE...

A national document of this magnitude required numerous hours of dialogue, research, evaluating, and editing. The development and production of the Primary School Mathematics Curriculum Guidelines could not have been made possible without the hard work, dedication, and commitment of Education Officers, principles, teachers, clerical officers, parents and members of the community who participated in the Needs Assessment Survey.

 

This curriculum document is intended to foster an understanding of the “whys” of Mathematics as well as appropriately meet the current and future needs of the student population in schools across The Bahamas.

 

The use of current research in Mathematics and a working knowledge of entry requirements for programmes at The College of The Bahamas and Colleges in the United

States, Canada, Great Britain and the University of the West Indies as well as adherence to our own goals, constituted the basis used by curriculum developers to formulate the objectives/content of this document.

 

It is our intention that teachers and parents use this document to guide their teaching of Mathematics, supplementing it with activities from texts and other resources to help our students attain the goals that are outlined in this document. READ MORE...

Teachers should take the time to familiarize themselves with the Scope & Sequence. The Scope & Sequence spans the objectives from pre-school to Grade 7. The following key has been provided so that teachers will know the levels at which their students are expected to be performing: B- Beginning, D- Developing, P- Proficient, R-Reinforcing and IT – Incidental Teaching.

 

The new Primary Language Arts Curriculum has been structured using three sub-goals. Below are a few ideas on how teachers can work through them.

 

Sub-goal 1 deals with what was traditionally known as Listening & Speaking but also has the added components of Viewing and Presenting. In many instances these objectives can be integrated into some of the other sub-goals or as teachers work with the content related subjects. Individual lessons need not be planned for each objective. For example Listening objective 1.13, Presenting objective 1.57 and Comprehension objective 2.46 in Sub-goal 2, can be combined within a lesson as they are all related to the skill of sequencing and would provide for the teaching of the skill in various contexts. Teaching this way would allow students who are not able to read well, an opportunity to at least understand the skill. As students interact with informational texts, videos and DVDs, the Viewing objectives can be taught.

 

Sub-goal 2 incorporates the various components of reading: phonemic awareness, phonics, vocabulary, fluency and comprehension in addition to some of the basic literary skills. The components and literary skills should be integrated into reading lessons and taught in the context of literature. Everyday reading materials should be used. For example, if you are teaching the skill of making predictions, then the weather report from the newspaper could be incorporated into the lesson. The Literacy Resource Handbook that was recently published in conjunction with OAS, The College of Department of Education, Primary Language Arts September 2010 2 The Bahamas and The Ministry of Education and The Literacy Enhancement series should be useful aids in the teaching of this sub-goal.

 

Sub-goal 3 focuses on the teaching of Writing. Grammar, Spelling and Handwriting are tools to be used to improve students’ writing and are not to be taught as ends in themselves. Practice exercises should be provided to reinforce skills taught in Grammar, Spelling and Handwriting; however, the application of these skills should be emphasized in students’ writing and where applicable, in their speech as well. When scoring students’ writing, pieces should only be scored for what has been taught in the four areas. Develop a checklist. Each week the number of items on the checklist should increase as new skills that have been taught are added. The old items on the checklist should be continually reinforced. By the end of the school year, a sizeable checklist should have been generated. Students should be aware of what is contained in the checklist and should be encouraged to use it to assess their own writing before it is even submitted to the teacher. Students’ writing should be marked for content, mechanics (Grammar and Spelling) and handwriting/presentation. The books Grammar & Writing, Write Source, 6 + 1 Traits of Writing and also Developing Skills in Composition should be helpful resources to use. READ MORE...

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The Bahamas’ Ministry of Education (Moe) has responsibility for more than 50,000 K-12 students in approximately 170 educational institutions in The Commonwealth of The Bahamas, which are dispersed over 14 districts in the major islands. Our goal is to increase the graduation rate from 50% to 80% by 2030. The MoE aims to create an educational system that is technologically sound and competitive and that develops the strengths of each child, whether academic or otherwise, towards the maximum contribution that he/she is able to make to the national development of The Bahamas.

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